The Economy and the Classroom

Tonight was my queer media class. We watched The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls in Love, a film about a working class lesbian with lesbian moms who falls in love with a straight, straight laced, middle class girl with a professor mother (dad absent). It is a story that combines issues of sexuality with those of class, education, and to some extent race (the couple is interracial but the film does not address racial difference partly b/c the film was originally imagined as an all white cast with the part played by black actress, Nicole Parker, being heavily based on the life of the white writer and director, Maggie Maggenti). Along with Shelter, which is next week’s movie, True Adventures was a film I picked for our team taught class because I wanted to make sure that issues of class and class conflict were part of the course. Often I think the queer community gets depicted as a white middle class urban experience and that not only erases the expierences of rural, working class, and poor queers but also places an undue burden on both them and poc (categories which can/do overlap) because of the ways queerness gets crafted as “white folly” or “middle class boredom.”  What I had not planned on was the banking crisis and the anger, resentment, and worry that would be triggered by watching this harmlessly sweet film.

I plan to write more when I have processed everything that happened in class tonight (and when I have figured out how to write about it with the new ethical standards of the blog – ie no info about specific people without their consent). But until then, I am going to leave you with a video one of them mentioned as “saying it all.”  (I had to suppress the urge to laugh when they said they’d seen it on vivir latino, since that is a blog I read and like all the other blogs I read, I just haven’t had the chance to get there with the blog move. So htp my student via vivir latino, it is a small world . . .)

Rebel Diaz “A Trillion”

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