Comment Policy Update

charles Schulz

I hate to get all academic on you all, especially after 4+ years of being pretty open about comments here. It seems that both the influx of overzealous fans on some threads and the linking of this blog by several courses this term, has led to an influx of comment makers who do not read the posts before launching into commentary. I’ve always had to say to one or two people every season, “Please read the whole post before you comment” but I have never had to delete a whole stack of comments because they are both offensive (violating ToS because of name calling or engaging in oppression) but also complete OT. My favorites have been the ones that claim posts about multiple racial groups are “attacking white people” because they never bother to read a) the title of the post or b) the content beyond something quoted to them elsewhere or the first three lines (I’m not sure which it is, probably both) and those saying posts are invalid because “you did not mention [white character here]” in black history month posts. So here is the major change in the comment policy so we are clear:

In order for your comment to be approved on this blog you need to have (1) read the entire post and (2) write a comment that reflects that you have read it even if you are only referring to a single issue or portion.

These guidelines are added to the existing expectation that comments avoid the use of epithets, name calling, swarming, and oppression, as well as be expressed with no or limited use of superlatives and “profanity”. As always, the unspoken but oft held guideline here and in the offshoot conversations that occur on twitter is that while this is not an academic blog any discussion we engage in is meant to move our understanding forward and to encourage thought on the subject and the broadening of perspectives, as well as challenge ideologies or concepts either in the post or the world. If you want to attack or deride people or positions or shout out “I am a fan and nothing my fan universe does can ever be wrong!” you are in the wrong place, but it does not mean that there are not places where you can do that openly and freely. Making an argument means more than saying “I have watched 2 full episodes of this [or] I slept in Superman footie pjs therefore I am right and you are wrong.” Long term fandom means you bring something important to the table not that you are infallible or the thing you like untouchable. For those of you who are new or returning students assigned to read here, becoming a scholar means engaging ideas and discussion not just announcing an opinion based on your experience or preferences.

Most of you are probably scratching your heads and thinking, “Umm hasn’t that always been the way we discuss things here” and the answer is yes. So trust me when I tell you there is a reason I have to write this.

And as a side note, if you are an instructor or TA using this blog for your class and you have not already discussed with your students the meaning of learning communities, netiquette, and engaged discussion, you should. As we know, social media inundates most students’ lives in one way or another and in many of those mediums anything goes. If you do not outline the kind of intellectual work you want them to do when they are using popular media then they will use the default of social media interaction that has led to so much bullying, denigration of others, and utter lack of engagement beyond one’s 5 second quip. As we integrate media into our classrooms we have to be savvy about meaning making and critical thinking otherwise our students walk away with very little new information. Their lack of engagement also means that many of the producers of that media you want them to learn from and with are left to wipe up the mess they leave behind. I enjoy being linked to for academic purposes every term, but I think everyone would get more out of it if students were using the medium as text and not as an extension of Facebook.

2 thoughts on “Comment Policy Update

  1. Well, it’s a shame that some folks don’t know how to use the net in ways that kind and generous. On the other hand, I am glad that your blog is featured reading for students.

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